The need to follow the law


IN THIS WORLD, every nation has its own law. Laws that would regulate the actions of people, to prohibit something, prescribe a certain act or punish a crime. But why do we need to follow the law?

Rolando Suarez, in his book Introduction to Law, explains that law, in its strict legal sense, is defined as a rule of conduct, just and obligatory, laid down by legitimate authority for common observance and benefit.

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'They have been long written in the Bible'

 
…IF YOU WERE living in the past when there were no telescope, camera, television, space shuttle, and the like, would you believe if someone came with the news that the earth was round and hanged on nothing?
          The old view is contrary to this. Such news was then far-fetched and hard to believe. People would have probably just raised an eyebrow, shrugged the shoulders, or condemned the one who brought such unusual information. This happened to Galileo Galilei ...
 

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The frogs called humans


...Frogs use a variety of complex calls, including ribbets, croaks, and other sounds. Surprisingly, “they produce these sounds in much the same way as humans speak... And as if emphasizing one of the functions of communication among humans, “frog communication is particularly important during the mating season, when male frogs call to attract females.”

But there’s another striking similarity between frogs and humans ...

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'Richness' of life in atheistic-naturalistic-materialistic worldview: superficial

 

 

 

AIMING TO SHOW PERHAPS that his worldview is far from being unhealthy, today’s most celebrated atheist Richard Dawkins affirms that atheists’ naturalism produces the “richness” in human life.

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Is boyfriend-girlfriend quarrel a debate?

... the proposition, “Patutunayan ko na ang hindi marunong magmahal sa sariling wika ay hindi higit sa hayop at hindi malansang isda,” does not only confuse the debaters on who should take the burden of proof, but also leaves everyone else guessing what the topic really is. Lesson learned: Fill the proposition with negative terms and the debate will become a stand-up comedy!

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Their 'sacred' cow!

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DID YOU KNOW THAT COW is the animal that had something to do with the death of  Abraham Lincoln's mother? Or, that there's a country that has Bill of Rights for cows? ...

Losing one's nose for mathematics


TYCHO BRAHE, THE DANISH ASTRONOMER who made comprehensive astronomical measurements of the solar system and whose data were used by his assistant, Johannes Kepler, to formulate his (Kepler) laws of planetary motion, lost his nose in a duel with one of his students over a mathematical computation.

Scholar Noel Botham in his book The Book of Useless Information (New York, NY: Penguin Group [USA] Inc., 2006) reports that Brahe wore a silver replacement nose for the rest of his life.

 

 

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The famous bath-tub's Eureka (The elegance of science)

 

 

THERE WAS NO FEELING of global warming then, but just say he was finding comfort in immersing his body in water anyhow. But when the idea came to Archimedes how to test the gold crown of the king for fraudulent admixture of silver, he is said to have leaped out of his bath-tub and run naked down the streets of Syracuse (Sicily), shouting “Eureka”, which means “I have found it!”

 

 

 

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